Indiana Sightseeing…Part Three…Middlebury and Quilt Gardens

OK, I have no excuses for being this late in posting. Well, OK. Maybe a few. But I won’t go into too much detail, other than one of the worst winters we have had in ages, being sick most of February, and then trying to play “catch up” on everything else that didn’t get done.

But let’s get back to the topic at hand…our trip to Indiana last September. Yeah, I know, it’s been a long time ago, and is pretty much “old news” by now, but on the other hand, you haven’t heard it yet, or seen the pictures, so it still counts as new information.

Immediately upon leaving the RV/MH Hall of Fame, we headed south just a little ways to Linton’s Enchanted Gardens Nursery, our next stop on this day’s tour.

But first, let me explain as best I can what a quilt garden is, for those who don’t know. It isn’t a garden where people display their hand sewn quilts. It is actually a living quilt-like design, in a garden, made out of patches of appropriately colored flowers.

Linton’s Enchanted Gardens is a huge nursery on the east side of Elkhart, and straight south of the RV/MH Hall of Fame on County Road 17, and just a few blocks away. A sign near the entrance tells more about the quilt gardens on the Heritage Trail, and provides a map to other locations, along with free brochures.

Quilt Gardens Lintons SIgn

Quilt Gardens Linton's 1

Quilt Garden Linton's 2

Quilt Garden Linton's 3

Quilt Gardens Linton's 4

(Sorry about the finger at the top of the picture. It’s hard to see these LCD screens in bright sunlight.) From here, we headed toward Middlebury, one of my wife’s old stomping grounds. (She’s actually from Wakarusa/Nappanee area.) Our first stop was the city park, where there is a military memorial with her father’s and uncle’s names on it.

Middlebury Mem. Park 1

Roll of Honor

Middlebury Roll of Honor Names

Middlebury Cannons

The next stop was the Krider Garden, also in Middlebury. It is said to be the “crown jewel” of the Middlebury Parks system. The gardens were originally designed by Krider Nurseries for display at the 1933/34 Chicago World’s Fair.

Krider Windmill

Although their quilt garden was the smallest we encountered, we also have to realize that this was September, and toward the end of the peak flower season.

Krider quilt garden

The next stop was at the housing community of Greencroft, also in Middlebury. This garden was on flat land, but there was a small observation tower built next to it, to get a better view of the garden,

Quilt Garden Middlebury 2

From there, we went out to the Dutch Country Market, on County Road 16, just east of town, where they had a small quilt garden next to their driveway. This one was tipped, so that it could be seen better. It was right next to their driveway, so there was nowhere that a viewing tower could have been built.

Quilt Garden Middlebury East

The largest by far was at the famous Das Dutchman Essenhaus  Restaurant. At roughly 3200 square feet, it was huge. They also placed it on a hill next to the parking lot, behind the hotel, where there was a good angle for viewing, as well as ample parking.

Quilt Garden at Das Essenhaus

This was about all we had time for, although there are many more quilt gardens along the Heritage Trail. There are so many web sites online that show more photos and information that to link to any one of them would be an injustice. Just go to Google.com and search “quilt gardens middlebury” and you will find all kinds of sites, which also link to other sites, etc., etc.  I’m sure you know how that goes. The professional pictures they have put mine to shame, with more vibrant colors and better photo angles.

Next up, we will go to a little place along Lake Michigan in the Indiana Dunes area, to Beverly Shores, and see some unique houses that were moved across Lake Michigan by Barge, from the Chicago World’s Fair.

After that, we’ll show you one of the most fantastic model train layouts that we have ever seen, near Valparaiso! We’ll also visit an award winning iconic ice cream shop, and much more. Stick around, there’s more to come! (And I promise to not take as long to post as I did this last time!)